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A. Virtue Epistemology > J.D. Swartwood on "Wisdom as an Expert Skill"

J.D. Swartwood has several recently published articles including this one in Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, June 2013, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 511-528.

Abstract: Practical wisdom is the intellectual virtue that enables a person to make reliably good decisions about how, all-things-considered, to live. As such, it is a lofty and important ideal to strive for. It is precisely this loftiness and importance that gives rise to important questions about wisdom: Can real people develop it? If so, how? What is the nature of wisdom as it manifests itself in real people? I argue that we can make headway answering these questions by modeling wisdom on expert skill. Presenting the main argument for this expert skill model of wisdom is the focus of this paper. More specifically, I’ll argue that wisdom is primarily the same kind of epistemic achievement as expert decision-making skill in areas such as firefighting. Acknowledging this helps us see that, and how, real people can develop wisdom. It also helps to resolve philosophical debates about the nature of wisdom. For example, philosophers, including those who think virtue should be modeled on skills, disagree about the extent to which wise people make decisions using intuitions or principled deliberation and reflection. The expert skill model resolves this debate by showing that wisdom includes substantial intuitive and deliberative and reflective abilities -

See more at: http://wisdomresearch.org/blogs/publications/archive/2013/06/01/quot-wisdom-as-an-expert-skill-quot.aspx#sthash.3hhUnmM2.dpuf


- See more at: http://wisdomresearch.org/blogs/publications/archive/2013/06/01/quot-wisdom-as-an-expert-skill-quot.aspx#sthash.3hhUnmM2.dpuf
November 28, 2013 | Registered CommenterGuy Axtell